Course Information

 

for INTELLIGENCE Department


Fundamentals of Intelligence (INT 610)

Credits:3

This is an introductory course in intelligence practices for those looking to enter this field or interact with it. The course identifies the component parts of the Intelligence Community, describes the functions of collection and analysis, explains how intelligence is disseminated, and discusses the relationship of the IC with policymakers, Congress, and the public. This course will provide students the foundation of knowledge to prepare for more advanced study in intelligence or related fields. Students who complete this course will: • Identify the members of the Intelligence Community and their roles; • Discuss the intelligence cycle and other functions of intelligence; and • Analyze the relationship of the IC with the different branches of government and the public

Principles of Intelligence Analysis (INT 613)

Credits:3

Introduction to Cybersecurity (INT 621)

Credits:3

Research Methods for the Social Sciences (INT 639)

Credits:3

Principles of Counterintelligence (INT 662)

Credits:3

Collection, Analysis, and Presentation (INT 712)

Credits:3

This course provides a critical overview of the Intelligence Cycle – from collection to analysis to presentation. The course assesses intelligence-gathering techniques and approaches for various types of information including HUMINT, SIGINT, etc. It then acquaints students with aspects of Intelligence Analysis; the evaluation of data through the use of subject expertise, critical thinking, and the application of techniques designed to overcome limitations in human cognition. It will examine the analysts’ role in the larger national security arena, state, and local organizations and in the private sector. And it will show the importance of the effective presentation of this information under varying circumstances and leadership desires. Through this course, students will be able to: • Understand the concepts, history, and structure of intelligence collection; • Analyze and evaluate the role of the collector in the understanding and influencing; • Think critically and make well-reasoned judgments on ambiguous or incomplete information; • Contextualize information with broader events and strategic goals; and • Communicate ideas clearly, concisely, and effectively in writing, discussions, and presentations.

Principles of Intelligence Analysis (INT 713)

Credits:3

Counter Intelligence (INT 714)

Credits:3

The aim of this course is to show how counterintelligence activity protects US national security by 1) defending against acts of penetration, sabotage, and physical violence undertaken by foreign intelligence agencies and 2) defeating an adversary’s efforts by identifying and manipulating its behavior through deception and/or the exploitation of its agents. The course addresses the relationship between the intelligence and law enforcement communities as well as between civilian and military agencies. It also emphasizes the increasing importance of cyber espionage and economic espionage in an age of globalization. Through this course, students will: • Analyze methods to defend against foreign and domestic espionage; • Elaborate the use of deception to defeat other actor’s intelligence capabilities; • Examine the role of espionage and counterintelligence as means of achieving national goals; • Assess the growing relationship between the intelligence and law enforcement communities and the relationship between civilian and military agencies; • Evaluate the role of counterintelligence in cyber espionage and economic espionage; and • Communicate ideas clearly, concisely, and effectively in writing, discussions, and presentations.

Defense Intelligence (INT 718)

Credits:3

The American Way of Spying: The Evolution and Practice of U.S. Counterintelligence (INT 719)

Credits:3

The American Way of Spying: The Evolution and Practice of U.S. Counterintelligence Activities and Operations”. Events over the past few years, to include such well publicized incidents as the Russian Illegals' case; high-profile cyber-attacks on U.S. sensitive databases and political campaigns (to include Moscow’s purported effort to influence the 2016 US Presidential election; and unauthorized leaks of classified information by Trusted Insiders, have re-focused attention on the role of Counterintelligence (CI) in protecting against espionage and other activities directed against the U.S.

National Security Law for Intelligence Professionals (INT 731)

Credits:3

Counterterrorism Strategy (INT 741)

Credits:3

Non-Traditional Use of Intelligence (INT 744)

Credits:3

Fighting the Drug War (INT 745)

Credits:3

Cyber Intelligence (INT 746)

Credits:3

This course examines the vast frontier of Cyberspace and the Internet over which travels ever increasing amounts of information and communications. This new dimension of power has strong positive and negative implications for U.S. national security strategy and policy. For national security, Cyberspace represents a unique challenge, as it has no borders or boundaries unlike previous power dimensions -- land, sea, air and space. Past separations between government and the private sector and national security and law enforcement have been blurred. Cyberspace also represents an arena where a non-state actor’s powers can equal or exceed any nation state. And, 20th Century based government institutions often have trouble reacting to its 21st century instantaneous speed, ubiquity and volume. By the end of the course, the student will be able to: • Address the issues of volume, velocity and veracity of information in cyber space and how they relate to intelligence gathering, analysis and dissemination in both the public and private sector; • Evaluate the ability of non-nation state players to effect national and corporate security; • Understand the challenges of devising systems to secure the current internet; and • Examine the legal and politic implication of a system without borders

Defense Intelligence (INT 748)

Credits:3

Homeland Security Intelligence (INT 749)

Credits:3

Comparative Intelligence Organizations (INT 750)

Credits:3

Religious Extremism and Counterterrorism (INT 751)

Credits:3

Psychology and Motivation of U.S. Islamic Terrorism (INT 790)

Credits:3

INT 790: Psychology and Motivation of U.S. Islamic Terrorism - Independent Study - Prof. Ronald Marks

Cambridge University - International Security and Intelligence Studies (INT 795)

Credits:3

This four-week summer programme offers a unique opportunity to work with leading practitioners and academics from the security and intelligence communities in the delightful riverside setting of Magdalene College. The University, now one of the highest ranked in the world, dates back to the early C13th and the earliest College foundations are clustered at the heart of the medieval City. Chaired by Sir Richard Dearlove (formerly head of MI6, Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service) and convened by Professor Michael Goodman and Dr. David Gioe, the International Security and Intelligence Programme (ISI) will consider the claims of state secrecy, the threat of nuclear proliferation, of cyber-attack, of terrorism, the problems generated by the demand for regional security and the security challenges of revolutions and governing diversity. Intelligence collection, analysis of the product, and its dissemination to customers remain at the core of the intelligence cycle. Counterintelligence and covert action play more opaque but still vital roles at the heart of the nation state. Understanding these perspectives, what intelligence can achieve, but also its limitations, are major Programme and Conference themes.

Intelligence Thesis (INT 800)

Credits:3