Course Information

 

for NATIONAL SECURITY Department


NATO in the Age of Hybrid Warfare - Czech Republic (INT 795)

Credits:0

This summer seminar was offered by the Prague Security Studies Institute in cooperation with NATO's Public Diplomacy Division and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic, July 1 - 7, Orlik, Czech Republic.

Introduction to National Security (NSC 601)

Credits:3

National security always has been critical to our survival and success and a country. But, it is not a static concept. It has undergone change from the beginning of the republic; the changes have been especially profound since the end of the Cold War. Now it must be understood as any threat, challenge or opportunity that impacts the interests and well-being of the country and, in fact, often well beyond the country’s borders. Changes in the political order and vastly different technology have necessitated an approach to security that was unthinkable and unnecessary just 25 years ago.

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand and apply the framework of security, strategy, interests and policy in a new, globalizing world;
  • Select and identify key issues that are the focus of national security; and
  • Analyze national security issues from an international context that focuses on the fluctuating world of partners and adversaries.

Leadership in National Security (NSC 603)

Credits:3

This course was taught as DMA 603 Leadership in National Security. Four students took the course taught by Mr. Blau in the 2015 Spring Semester.

U.S. China Strategic Relations (NSC 611)

Credits:3

Operational Capabilities Analysis (NSC 620)

Credits:3

Combatting Terrorism in the 21st Century (NSC 621)

Credits:3

Research Methods for the Social Sciences (NSC 639)

Credits:3

National security always has been critical to our survival and success as a country. But, it is not a static concept. It has undergone change from the beginning of the republic; the changes have been especially profound since the end of the Cold War. Now it must be understood as any threat, challenge or opportunity that impacts the interests and well-being of the country and, in fact, often well beyond the country’s borders. Changes in the political order and vastly different technology have necessitated an approach to security that was unthinkable and unnecessary just 25 years ago. The objectives of this course are: • Understand and apply the framework of security, strategy, interests and policy in a new, globalizing world; • Select and identify key issues that are the focus of national security; and • Analyze national security issues from an international context that focuses on the fluctuating world of partners and adversaries.

National Security and Freedom (NSC 640)

Credits:3

Taught by Deborah Weiss, NSC 640 Freedom of Speech - Human Rights in National Security. In 2017 course title is entered as: National Security and Freedom

Introduction to Domestic Terrorism (NSC 670)

Credits:3

US Military Strategy (NSC 671)

Credits:3

Introduction to International and Domestic Terrorism (NSC 675)

Credits:3

Introduction to Counterterrorism Methodologies & Modus Operandi of Terrorist Groups (NSC 676)

Credits:3

This course outlines the conceptualization of contemporary counterterrorism practices in response to the September 11th attacks. In this course, students will examine domestic and international counterterrorism efforts predicated on radical techniques by terrorist organizations and individual radicals/extremists/guerillas. Finally, students will obtain a comprehensive outlook on the motivation behind terroristic acts.

US National Military Strategy (NSC 707)

Credits:3

This is a course on the history and practice of formulating US Military Strategy from its inception to the present. It prepares students for service at the strategic level through the study of key national security issues, national security policy and strategy formulation, the instruments of national power and the U.S. Government processes for integrating, balancing, and synchronizing the instruments of power in promoting and protecting the national interest. Additionally, key national strategy documents to include the National Security Strategy (NSS), National Defense Strategy (NDS) and the National Military Strategy (NMS) are examined as products of the strategy formulation process. Students will be introduced to the Theorists who have influenced National Military Strategy and the historical perspective of formulating National Military Strategy. At the course’s conclusion, students will formulate an alternative US National Military Strategy.

Unconventional Warfare (NSC 708)

Credits:3

Strategy: US and Foreign Perspectives on Strategic Approaches (NSC 711)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to approaches in strategy. Additionally, it exposes students to strategic thought and the theorists who have influenced both Eastern and Western practices of strategy. It provides a foundation in strategic theory and approaches to strategic thought as an analytical framework to understanding the cultural, religious, historical, and leadership sources of state and non-state actor behavior. It discusses foreign and US perspectives as well as concepts of the use of force (strength), stratagems (guile) and the power of information (ideas). Strategy must be developed in a holistic manner, integrating the diplomatic, informational, military and economic elements of power in a "whole of government" approach. Students will also be exposed to the strategy formulation process of ends, ways and means. At the course's conclusion, students will formulate an alternative Strategy which balances the approaches of strength and guile, coupled with the means to influence state and non-state actors with its ideas and economic resources to counteract an adversary's strategy.

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy/Missile Defense/CWMD (NSC 712)

Credits:3

Overview: An in depth look at three critical Defense areas of Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense and Countering WMD Policies that have been revised in 2017 and 2018. Nuclear Weapons: On January 27, 2017, President Donald Trump directed Secretary of Defense James Mattis to initiate a new Nuclear Posture Review (NPR). The President made clear that his first priority is to protect the United States, allies, and partners. He also emphasized both the long-term goal of eliminating nuclear weapons and the requirement that the United States have modern, flexible, and resilient nuclear capabilities that are safe and secure until such a time as nuclear weapons can prudently be eliminated from the world. Missile Defense: The Trump administration is working on an expanded U.S. missile defense policy that would address certain threats from Russia and China, departing from a previous strategy that focused nearly exclusively on rogue nations such as North Korea and Iran. The new policy will still call for bolstered technology against rogue states, with a particular focus on weapons to intercept North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s missiles. But it will also mention the need to consider missile threats from Russia and China, according to people familiar with the review. Countering WMD: The Department of Defense Strategy for Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction seeks to ensure that the United States and its allies and partners are neither attacked nor coerced by actors with WMD. It outlines three end states: no new WMD possession, no WMD use, and minimization of WMD effects. The strategy also establishes countering WMD priority objectives for the Department of Defense (DoD), defines an approach for achieving them, and identifies essential activities and tasks. Countering WMD (CWMD) objectives focus on cooperative efforts to shape the security environment and take early action against adversaries. These objectives are to reduce incentives to pursue, possess, and employ WMD; to increase the barriers to WMD acquisition, proliferation, and use; to manage WMD risks emanating from hostile, fragile, or failed states and safe havens; and to deny the effects of current and emerging WMD threats through layered, integrated defenses.

Relevance of America's Founding Principles to US Global Security Interests (NSC 720)

Credits:3

Strategy: Strength, Guile, and Ideas (NSC 722)

Credits:3

Political Strategy and US National Security (NSC 727)

Credits:3

The Environment, Pandemics, and National Security (NSC 728)

Credits:3

National Security Leadership (NSC 729)

Credits:3

National Security Planning, Strategy, and Decision Making for the 21st Century (NSC 730)

Credits:3

Washington’s problem in a nutshell is that it doesn’t think very well. The last quarter century has seen an explosion in the human capacity to create and manipulate new knowledge—yet many of the instruments used to support national security leadership are as creaky as ever. All this needs to change if America wants to outthink it enemies and it help it friends secure a safe, free, and prosperous future. This course provides both an introduction to the theoretical constructs and practical exercises in the three critical pillars of overseeing national security affairs—planning, strategy, and decision-making. Lessons provide a foundation for the skills, knowledge, and attributes to analyze, address, and manage national security affairs at the operational and strategic levels.

National Security Law for Intelligence Professionals (NSC 731)

Credits:3

Low Intensity Conflict (NSC 732)

Credits:3

The course is a detailed examination of the theory and practice of conflict in circumstances less than general conventional war. Key concepts and strategic principles pertaining to asymmetric warfare, terrorism, insurgency and counterinsurgency, irregular warfare, unconventional warfare, and military operations less than war (peacekeeping and humanitarian assistance) will be examined. This course examines the causes, conduct, patterns, and effects of conflict short of total or general war. It covers the modern insurgency period from Mao Tse Tung’s approach in the Chinese Civil War through our present times with the Global Jihad. It asks four fundamental questions in the U.S. context: • What is modern war in today’s contemporary operating environment? • What paths has it traveled in the post-World War II era into the early 21st Century? • What are the trends and where is it headed

Diplomacy as an Element of National Power (NSC 733)

Credits:3

How is Diplomacy changing in a globalized world with all of the new challenges in the 21st Century? What impact has globalization had on the rules based system of International Order? In today’s world, broad knowledge and specialized skills are required to build cooperation, defuse tension, and promote peace between and among nations, groups, and other entities. This overview course helps students develop skill sets and prepares them to become an international problem solver in any sector, including public, private, nonprofit, and the military.

Democratic Practices and Issues (NSC 734)

Credits:3

International Relations Theory (NSC 735)

Credits:3

Independent Study: German Strategy to Deal with Terror Attacks Since the Migrant Crisis (2015-2018) (NSC 790)

Credits:3

Issues in Contemporary Europe (NSC 790)

Credits:3

NATO in the Age of Hybrid Warfare - Czech Republic (NSC 795)

Credits:0

National Security Thesis (NSC 800)

Credits:3