Course Information

 

for REGIONAL STUDIES Department


US-China Strategic Relations (RST 611)

Credits:3

Ideological Roots of Terrorism (RST 629)

Credits:3

This course was taught only during the 2015 Spring Semester. Four students enrolled. Instructor was T. Blau

Strategic Issues in the Middle East (RST 635)

Credits:3

RST 635 was originally listed as "DMA 700" in the 2015 Fall Semester

US Competitive Strategies in the Greater Middle East (RST 640)

Credits:3

US Competitive Strategies in Europe (RST 641)

Credits:3

Arab-Israeli Conflict: Strategy and Policy (RST 642)

Credits:3

Non-State Actors in the Arab-Israeli Conflict (RST 642)

Credits:3

This course will investigate the evolution of the Arab-Israeli conflict and the rise of non-state actors, and how they impact and influence the region and beyond. It will examine security challenges from Israeli and Palestinian factions, refugees, Salafi-jihadists, Shia militias, the media, special interest groups, NGOs, and cyberwarfare. The course will conclude with an interactive educational game simulation that prompts students to respond to domestic and international challenges and threats while representing the Israeli government and Palestinian Authority.

Politics & Statecraft of Sub-Saharan Africa (RST 644)

Credits:3

While threats of the 20th century arose from powerful nation states, the key dimensions of the future – globalization, multi-national violent conflicts, and the potential proliferation of weapons of mass destruction mean great dangers from the relative weak states and ungoverned areas of Africa. Globalization enhances the awareness of the world to the most basic events, making speed of analysis and decision making more important and the consequences more significant. The objective of this course is to transform how professionals think about Africa and its interactions with the rest of the world.

Politics & Statecraft of Latin America (RST 645)

Credits:3

This course provides an introductory view of the politics and statecraft of Latin America from the 19th century through today. It will focus on Latin America's political history, security, economics, and political economy, with a particular emphasis on the role and influence of the United States in the region. It will also analyze the similarities and differences in how regional and global political and economic trends -- independence, populism, revolutionary movements, democratization, and neoliberal reforms -- have manifested themselves throughout the region. Course materials will include a mixture of books, articles, and multimedia. By the end of the course, students should be able to: • Identify and understand the most important analyses of Latin American politics • Demonstrate a firm understanding of the U.S. role in Latin America • Summarize the major trends that have swept Latin America in the 20th century • Develop writing skills based on the course material

Order and Crisis in Contemporary Europe (RST 647)

Credits:3

This course will analyze the elements of order and crisis, stability and instability, integration and disintegration in contemporary Europe. It will explore how European integration – in combination with a strong transatlantic partnership – allowed for unparalleled economic growth, political stability and pacification in Western Europe. This course will discuss how this model grew to be exported to Central and Eastern Europe, in the expectation that it would lead to an ever closer, ever enlarging Europe. It will shed light on how EUphoria quickly gave way to Europe’s current crisis predicament, arguing that the multiple crises that have plagued the continent in the last decade stem to a large extent from flaws in the construction of those very institutions that allowed Europe to flourish over the past seventy years.

Strategic Issues in Central Europe (RST 702)

Credits:3

Islamic Politics and Terrorism (RST 725)

Credits:3

Northeast Asia Security (RST 726)

Credits:3

Russian Politics and Statecraft (RST 727)

Credits:3

This survey course on Russian politics and statecraft addresses enduring questions on: patterns of cooperation and confrontation with other great powers, a centrally dominated economy, and a political culture that exploits weak formal political institutions to sustain a very small leadership ground. In addressing these issues, we ask: What are the wars that have defined Russia’s borders? When and why do Russian leaders challenge other states? What does power in Russia look like? Who are the rulers and their supporters? How do they obtain, practice, and lose power? In reviewing the origins and practices of Russian statecraft, we will assess when Russia as a great power has been (dis-) satisfied with the international distribution of economic and political benefits, and when it has sought to revise or maintain the international order. We will use this knowledge to address current issues in Russia’s relations with the Euro-Atlantic alliance and other world powers, including contentious issues such as money laundering, sanctions regimes, “information wars,” and Russia’s declared and undeclared conflicts.

Politics and Statecraft of Central Asia and the Caucuses (RST 730)

Credits:3

This survey lecture course on Central Asian and Caucasian politics, economics, and statecraft addresses the large, diverse, and yet poorly understood area between Europe, Middle East, Asia-Pacific, and Russia. Although the course emphasizes the contemporary period and the divergent paths the states of Central Asia and the Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) have taken following the end of the Soviet Union, we will evaluate the Imperial Russian and Soviet periods of regional history to understand the common origins of the political, economic, and social environments we see today.

Security and Government in South Asia (RST 731)

Credits:3

The course will focus primarily on India, Pakistan and Afghanistan but will include examination of Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal and Sri Lanka as well as South Asian links with Central Asia and Burma. Chinese, US and other external actors also will be considered. The course will begin with an exploration of South Asian geographic, environmental and ethnic realities. The historical experiences that shape national identities and aims then will be examined in some detail followed by a d exploration of the evolution of modern India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and the other South Asian states. This discussion of tensions both internal and regional will blend into an exploration of South Asian economic realities and potential, The size and power of Indian and Pakistani military forces merit both a class considering their conventional balances and a second assessing their nuclear capabilities, doctrines and strategies. After a class devoted to the presentation and consideration of student research, the course will conclude with examinations of the role of the US, China, Russia and other external actors and; finally, such enduring problems as terrorism and future developments.

International Relations (RST 735)

Credits:3

Oxford Analytica Conference Christ Church Oxford United Kingdom (RST 790)

Credits:0

Griffin Wilson, Andrew Dieckhaus, Kevin Truitte, Jackson Wright, Alexander Gregg, Tyler Hannon, Ian McManus, Julia Girardi, and Anna Murray